News about Universal Medical Systems and Veterinary Imaging

In The News

"The world of medicine is always evolving. It doesn't matter if it's human, canine, or equine – new ideas and concepts are being tried and tested on a daily basis, all with the goal of improving health. Sometimes, developments have a trickle-down effect, helping other species wherein there was no initial intention. This has been the case with recent advancements in equine imaging: CT scanners, positron emission tomography scanners, three-dimensional imaging and 360-degree digital radiographic studies."

Read the full story here…

Innovations in Equine CT Scanning

Innovations in Equine CT Scanning

“THE CUBS AIN'T GONNA WIN NO MORE"

Tug and Dexter, distant cousins of Billy Goat Murphy, to appear at Game One of World Series

In an effort to promote the health, reputation and well being of all animals,

Universal Medical Systems will sponsor the appearance of two Billy goats at the World Series at Gateway A at 9:00 am on October 25

Cleveland – October 24, 2016 — Tug and Dexter, distant cousins to Murphy, the famous Billy Goat who was kicked out of the 1945 World Series, will appear outside Progressive Field at Gateway A at 9:00 a.m. prior to Game One of the World Series on October 25. Universal Medical Systems Inc., Solon, Ohio, the world's premier provider of veterinarian diagnostic imaging systems promoting the health, reputation and well being of all animals is sponsoring the appearance.

The legend of the curse began on October 6, 1945, during Game Four of the 1945 World Series between the Cubs and the Detroit Tigers. Billy Goat Tavern owner Billy Sianis was at the game with his Billy goat named Murphy and even had a ticket for the goat.

Ushers asked him to leave because animals weren’t allowed in Wrigley Field and fans complained about the goat’s odor. Even owner P.K. Wrigley wouldn’t let the goat enter the park. Sianis was so angry that he declared that the Cubs would never win another World Series. “Them Cubs, they ain’t gonna win no more,” is what Sianis supposedly shouted.

Although the Cubs were up 2-1 in the 1945 Series, they would end up losing game four and lost the series in seven games. They haven’t been to the World Series since.

On the 46th anniversary of Billy Sianis' death, the Cubs advanced to the 2016 World Series, beating the Los Angeles Dodgers to win the 2016 National League Championship Series, and positioning them to play the Cleveland Indians in the World Series.

"The curse will continue and the rabid Cleveland Indians fans worldwide will join with us to insure no animal injustices are ever forgotten," commented David R. Zavagno, president of Universal Medical Systems. "The Indians will follow the pathway blazed by our World Champion Cleveland Cavaliers and the Cubs will remain a cursed franchise!"

About David R. Zavagno

David R. Zavagno, president of Universal Medical Systems, Inc., is passionate about Major League baseball. His insights and findings on diagnostic imaging in animals appear in numerous articles, broadcasts and interviews. He is an award-winning author from The Society of American Base Research. (SABR). For more information contact David Zavagno at 440-349-3210 or sales@universal-systems.com.

About Universal Medical Systems, Inc. of Ohio

Universal Medical Systems, Inc. (UMS) of Ohio is the leading innovative supplier of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging systems worldwide. Headquartered in Cleveland, Universal Medical Systems, Inc. offers medical, industrial and research imaging systems from desktop CT scanners to ultra high field three-tesla MRI scanners. An affiliated network of research, development, sales and service teams supports every Universal scanner. For more information visit: www.universal-systems.com http://www.veterinary-imaging.com/

About Haulin’ Goats

James and Heather Kovach moved from the suburbs to an 1834 farmhouse to pursue their dream of learning to live off the land by growing their own food sustainably and organically. They raise goats and chickens, and have a small orchard and a garden. Haulin’ Goats goat rental service’s mission is to help Northeast Ohioans landscape their properties in an environmentally friendly way by clearing their land with goats.

For more information visit http://asyouwishacres.com/ or call James Kovach at 330-242-6731.

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For more information or media interviews, please contact Nancy Valent at 216-513-8740 or nancy@NMVstrategies.com

October 19, 2016, 8:45 AM – As seen on CBSNews.com

Robotic CT at the University of Pennsylvania’s veterinary school allows a horse to remain awake and standing as scanners on two mechanical arms move around it. The resulting high-quality images, including some in 3D, for the first time offer detailed anatomical views of the animal in its normal, upright state.

“So the whole beauty of this technology, we hope, is that we’re going to be able to scan much greater numbers of patients much, much earlier in the process of things like stress-related injuries in a racehorse,” Richardson said.

© 2016 The Associated Press.

See full article here
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/this-new-ct-scanner-could-help-horses-and-humans/

from the PAULICK REPORT

ROBOTIC IMAGING SYSTEM COULD BE NEW WAVE, NEW COST SAVINGS

by  | 01.08.2016 | 2:43pm

At the center of a display space at the recent American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention stood a life-sized, fiberglass horse with enormous robotic tentacles zooming around it, holding plates and lenses. Computer screens behind the fiberglass horse sprang to life, drawing colorful models of what the inside of a living animal's spine or legs might look like after the swarm of high-tech activity. The whole thing looked like something out of a movie, and its producers believe that it will indeed prove as magical.  

The Equimagine system is celebrated as one of the first to use robots to take CT images of horses standing or in motion. CT scans use x-rays to capture three-dimensional images of the body in “slices” and are often used to look at bones as well as the head and spine. MRI, by contrast, does not use radiation, and while it also produces three-dimensional image ‘slices' of the inside of the body, it's more commonly used for soft tissue imaging. A computer program takes the two-dimensional images picked up by the machine and constructs a three-dimensional model of the body based upon them.

The Equimagine system promises to simplify the process of computed tomography scanning for veterinarians by allowing a horse to remain standing during the scan. The equine spine has long been a tricky beast to image because of the thickness of the body tissue surrounding it. For some areas of the body like the spine or head, clinics have previously had to anesthetize horses to do a CT scan, which not only takes a greater toll on the patient (and the client's wallet), it also means the horse is lying down during the scan. In some cases, the best way for a veterinarian to understand a horse's issue could be to see it as the body holds itself naturally. The system could also be used to conduct a scan of part of the body while the horse is in controlled motion, on a treadmill.

According to its maker, Universal Medical Systems, the robotic system can also be used with different types of imaging capture systems to save veterinarians some cash. The Equimagine can do fluoroscopy (a stream of radiographic image), dexa (bone density scanning), tomosynthesis (three-dimensional imaging of tissue), dynamic video radiography, and digital radiography in addition to CT.

The computer imaging in the Equimagine system is quite advanced — it actually builds a four-dimensional picture of the body section and takes some of the scaling work out of the process for the radiologist. A one-millimeter section of bone in reality is represented as one millimeter on the image, helping veterinarians better understand what they see.

“It's an easy thing to say, but a very difficult thing to do, and it can produce a lot of errors, especially when you're preparing for an operation,” said George Papaioannou, president of Four Dimensional Digital Imaging and 4DDI Equine, which collaborated with Universal Medical Systems on the technology.

Many horse people took a look at the whirring, quick-moving robotic arms zipping around the plastic horse's head and wondered how well a live animal would tolerate the process. David Zavagno, president of Universal Medical Systems, said the horses who have been scanned so far have handled the motion of the robots well, particularly for leg scans. Many of them have worn blinkers and had the scan done in an open room to prevent too much anxiety during spinal scans. Ultimately, Zavagno envisions the system positioned around stocks, where a horse could develop a sense of comfort within their immediate environment. In case they do get jittery, the computer modeling system that accompanies the high-resolution images is designed to compensate for small movements on the horse's part.

Early users of the Equimagine include Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, who installed one of the first machines in a hospital setting. According to Dr. Tom Yarbrough, hospital director/chief surgeon at Dubai Equine Hospital and at Cornell Ruffian Equine Specialists, Maktoum plans to have his racehorses scanned regularly to look for bone changes that could warn of future injury. The system's makers hope that this kind of broad use of the machine in a population of working horses can provide veterinarians with more information about what types of anomalies to look for on high-powered CTs and other scans when trying to predict an injury.

“The ability now to start to see an active horse moving, walking, running, and see the dynamics of weight bearing, that's a whole new frontier of imaging that no one's ever been able to do,” said Zavagno. “Hopefully that will open some new doors to new understanding.”

Zavagno remains hopeful that the speed of the scan (demo sequences took seconds to show images of isolated areas of the spine or legs) will help the clinics pay back the expense of the machine more quickly and keep prices low, making it affordable for horsemen to use scans not just as diagnostic tools but as progress trackers for follow-up. The cost of the two-robot system for veterinarians is $425,000, while the four-robot system runs $895,000.

“Typically what you can do (for an injury) is rest. Well, how long do you rest? Just until he walks better? We're guessing or nerve blocking. If you look at the dynamics of what we've been doing, it's more guess than anything,” said Zavagno.  

The New Bolton Center at the University of Pennsylvania has already installed an Equimagine system, as has Cornell, and Universal Medical Systems plans to install several more at major East Coast clinics this year.

See video of the system at work on the PaulickReport Facebook page.

Copyright© 2016 PaulickReport.com. Reprinted with permission.

 

High-tech for horses: New whole body CT system uses robotic technology

Robotics-driven design provides an unlimited range of motion and unencumbered access to the horse's entire anatomy.

Dec 21, 2015
By dvm360.com staff
VETERINARY MEDICINE

From Universal Medical Systems, Inc., of Solon, Ohio, and Equine 4DDI comes a new computed tomography (CT) system allowing for whole-body scans of standing and moving horses. The equipment, called Equimagine, operates as an imaging workstation using two or four robotic arms to capture CT, fluoroscopic and bone-density images, tomosynthesis, dynamic video radiography imaging and digital radiography. Check out the example in the video below.

Equimagine was unveiled earlier this month at the American Association of Equine Practitioners annual conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The imaging system will be capable of capturing the equine anatomy in a way never before possible, while the horse is awake, load-bearing, as well as moving on a treadmill. “This will revolutionize equine imaging,” says Barbara Dallap Schaer, VMD, DACVECC, DACVS, medical director of New Bolton Center, the large animal hospital of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. The university is the first veterinary hospital to own this technology.

According to a university release, ​the four-robot system can perform multiple modalities, including CT and can be used in conjunction with a high-speed treadmill. In the standing horse, this technology allows for the analysis of previously hard-to-image areas including the lower back, back, pelvis and upper part of the legs.

In sport horses, subtle problems of the neck, back, and pelvis affect performance; these are areas of substantial concern for riders and trainers. Having the ability to image these areas more effectively could mean a more accurate diagnosis.

According to the Penn Vet release, other benefits include:

> The fluoroscopy and CT capabilities of the system have tremendous potential for advancing cardiovascular imaging and treatment.

> The new four-dimensional imaging is much more detailed and can help to identify not only a fracture, but also its specific characteristics: location, depth, and breadth. ​Using the new technology will help to prevent injuries, especially in racehorses.

> The technology will allow early identification of horses with incomplete “occult” fractures in areas that can proceed to catastrophic failure.

“This is the most exciting development in veterinary imaging in over 50 years by enabling robotically driven imaging," says David Zavagno, president of Universal Medical Systems. "Never before has a product launched with 10 million dollars in backorders.”

Indeed, the Equimagine system is no small investment—prices start at $425,000 for Helios, the two-robot system. Universal Medical Systems offers fee-per-scan, straight lease and purchase options on all of their systems, according to their website.

EQUIMAGINE ™ High Definition Robotic CT Systems

Solon, OH-December 3, 2015- Universal Medical Systems, Inc. (UMS) of Ohio the leading innovative supplier of veterinary computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems worldwide and Four Dimensional Digital Imaging LLC announce a new fully robotic CT Technology to revolutionize whole-body scanning of standing and moving horses. The systems will be launched at the American Association of Equine Practitioner tradeshow in Las Vegas, December 5th-9th at booth #2425.

The new equipment, from Equine 4DDI is named EQUIMAGINE™ a four dimensional, ultra precise and safe stereo dynamic robotics-driven imaging system capable of imaging a standing horse providing CT, Flouro, Dexa, Tomosynthesis, dynamic video radiography imaging and digital radiography.

According to David Zavagno, President of UMS, “This is the most exciting development in veterinary imaging in over 50 years by enabling robotically driven imaging. Never before has a product launched with 10 million dollars in backorders.”

Dr. George Papaionannou, President of 4DDI states: “The energy and excitement for the product in the veterinary community is unprecedented.”

To see the demo video visit http://bit.ly/EQUIMAGINE_video

EQUIMAGINE operates as an imaging workstation, which circles the animal with either 2 or 4 robotic extensions. The CT scan allows for a single, comprehensive and accurate model of the patient-specific imaging area to be evaluated. Veterinarians and surgeons can assess whole body scanning during load bearing, evaluation of the head, neck, or posture pathology. Real time high-speed soft tissue deformation tracking is also an added function. The increasing availability of this technology provides the practitioner with a modality that is extending musculoskeletal imaging from diagnosis to imagebased real-time guidance of surgical procedures.

The EQUIMAGINE dynamic scanners are capable of providing accurate, sub-millimeter-resolution images in formats allowing 4D visualization of the complexity in the musculoskeletal or other soft issue regions. The robotics enablers reduce scan time and data fusion time. The scanners provide multimodal imaging (conventional panoramic, 360 Digital Radiography and somatometric imaging, in addition to stereo volumetric CT and tomosythesis images) improving anti-scatter, metal correction protocols, soft tissue contrast and incorporating task-specific protocols to minimize patient dose.

UMS is the general distributor of EQUIMAGINE with installations starting in The New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine in Kennett Square, PA, Equine Hospital in Dubai and multiple sites in California, The East Coast, Texas and Wyoming.

The EQUIMAGINE imaging system will be capable of capturing the equine anatomy in a way never before possible, while the horse is awake, load bearing, as well as moving on a treadmill. “This will revolutionize equine imaging,” said Dr. Barbara Dallap Schaer, medical director of New Bolton Center, the large animal hospital of the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Veterinary Medicine.

Existing CT systems require the horse to be anesthetized, and they are limited to the parts of the animal that fit into the cylindrical machines. The EQUIMAGINE system’s robotics-driven design provides an unlimited range of motion and unencumbered access to the horse’s entire anatomy. The quality and resolution of the real-time images created with the system far exceeds existing technology.

“The open structure of the scanner will allow us to capture high-quality CT images of the standing horse that we have had difficulty imaging before,” Dallap Schaer said. “We will be working to develop protocols to diagnose problems in the lower neck, back, pelvis and upper part of the legs.”

Products

EQUIMAGINE Helios – Two-Robot System capable of 3D volumetric imaging (unconstrained scanning geometry), flat panel based fluoroscopy, tomosynthesis and panoramic imaging.

EQUIMAGINE Zeus- Four-Robot System capable of 3D volumetric imaging (unconstrained scanning geometry), flat panel based fluoroscopy with 4D capabilities (stereotactic tracking of tissue deformation at high speeds (up to 16,000F/s data acquisition speed), stereo-tomosynthesis and stereopanoramic imaging.

EQUIMAGINE Technology

High-quality and throughput are rarely used in combination to describe any imaging processes. 4DDI’s technology has bridged this gap by combining the ability to image extensive portions of the equine patient at an unprecedented level of resolution and speed. To the practitioner this means profit and precision combined in one technology.

This paradigm shift in technology with state of the art, ultra high-speed, high resolution (significant improvement compared with existing systems: 160 micron resolution), four dimensional (4D) video – radiography (up to 16,000 frames per second) opens new markets for imaging while improving the precision of current diagnostics and advancing patient care.

About EQUINE 4DDI, Four Dimensional Digital Imaging for Equines

4DDI was formed as an innovative company in the imaging and medical devised markets. The founders of the company have extensive international experience in research, development and management of new technologies. They are building a world-class organization while changing the way imaging products are designed and operated. Center themes of 4DDI are dynamic accuracy matter. Founded on safe imaging for all and adopting personalized medicine for less with a focus on reduction offerings for every type of practice or hospital.

The company has expanded its network (main offices are located in New York NY) with developmental facilities including software and hardware laboratories, clinical sites, regulatory control locations, user groups, marketing and sales groups around the world. 4DDI has developed patented, licensed and productized imaging products related especially to the diagnostic, surgical planning and intervention in robotics-driven radiography markets. For more information, visit http://www.equine4ddi.com

About Universal Medical Systems, Inc. of Ohio

Universal Medical Systems, Inc. (UMS) of Ohio is the leading innovative supplier of veterinary computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system worldwide. Headquartered in Cleveland, Universal Medical Systems, Inc. offers medical, industrial and research imaging system from desktop CT Scanners and robotics to ultra high field three-tesla MRI scanners. An affiliated network of research, development, sales and service teams supports every UMS scanner. For more information visit http://www.veterinary-imaging.com and http://www.universal-systems.com

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For media interviews, please contact Nancy M. Valent at 216-513-8740 or email: nancy@NMVstrategies.com

Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center Offers New MRI Service

Universal Medical Systems provides O-scan equipment for high-quality MRI images in horses.


[July 30, 2015; Kennett Square, PA] – Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center now offers a new MRI system designed specifically for obtaining high-quality images in horses.

The O-Scan is a high-resolution MRI system for diagnostic imaging using a low-field magnet. The MRI is capable of imaging extremities, from the foot to the hock (tarsus) or knee (carpus). The system, manufactured by Esaote, can also be used for other large animals.

“We have undergone in depth training, including validating specific protocols, and are ready to admit patients for MRI evaluation,” said Dr. Barbara Dallap Schaer, New Bolton Center Medical Director. “We are excited about this addition to our imaging services and look forward to working on challenging cases.”

The MRI will be useful primarily for soft-tissue injuries associated with lameness, but will detect bone injury as well, Dallap Schaer said. It provides functional (inflammatory) information, in addition to anatomic data.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique that uses a magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the organs and tissues within the body. MRI provides additional information beyond radiography, computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound.

This new MRI replaces a previous system at New Bolton Center, installed in 2005 and used until recently. The acquisition of this new technology was funded in part by donor contributions.

All images will be reviewed by the clinician on the case, as well as a board-certified radiologist, with reports available within 48 hours.

The following studies will be available:
  • Foot, Bilateral feet
    The single-foot imaging includes a limited study of the opposite foot
    or a limited study of the pastern
  • Proximal suspensory, Bilateral suspensory
    Proximal suspensory includes a limited study of the opposite suspensory
  • Fetlock, Bilateral fetlock
  • Carpus, Bilateral carpus
  • Tarsus, Bilateral tarsus

The cost associated with an MRI scan includes a two-night stay at New Bolton Center, general anesthesia, the MRI scan and analysis, as well as other associated supply costs.

Appointments will be available Tuesday through Thursday, and can be made through the Surgery Section by contacting Cindy Stafford (610-925-6125) or Karen Kohlmorgen (610-925-6140), or through the Sports Medicine Section by contacting Jackie Seila (610-925-6490).

Please contact Dr. David Levine at 610-925-6125 or dglevine@vet.upenn.edu with any questions regarding the new system.

About Universal Medical Systems, Inc. of Ohio
Universal Medical Systems, Inc. (UMS) of Ohio is the leading innovative supplier of veterinary computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems worldwide. Headquartered in Cleveland, Universal Medical Systems, Inc. offers medical, industrial and research imaging systems from desktop CT scanners to ultra high field three-tesla MRI scanners. An affiliated network of research, development, sales and service teams supports every UMS scanner.
For more information visit www.veterinary-imaging.com and www.universal-systems.com

About Penn Vet
Penn Vet is a global leader in veterinary medicine education, research, and clinical care. Founded in 1884, Penn Vet is the only veterinary school developed in association with a medical school. The school is a proud member of the One Health Initiative, linking human, animal, and environmental health.

Penn Vet serves a diverse population of animals at its two campuses, which include extensive diagnostic and research laboratories. Ryan Hospital in Philadelphia provides care for dogs, cats, and other domestic/companion animals, handling more than 31,000 patient visits a year. New Bolton Center, Penn Vet’s large-animal hospital on nearly 700 acres in rural Kennett Square, PA, cares for horses and livestock/farm animals. The hospital handles more than 4,000 patient visits a year, while the Field Service treats nearly 36,000 patients at local farms. In addition, New Bolton Center’s campus includes a swine center, working dairy, and poultry unit that provide valuable research for the agriculture industry. For more information, visit www.vet.upenn.edu.

David R. Zavagno, Recipient of the 2015 Herrick Memorial
Award for Civic Achievement

The Early Settlers Association of the Western Reserve Recognizes Cleveland Businessman

Put-In-Bay Township, OH – July 16, 2015—The Friends of Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial, also known as The Perry Group, a volunteer, nonprofit organization is proud to announce that their Chairman, David R. Zavagno is the recipient of the 2015 Herrick Memorial Award for Civic Achievement presented by The Early Settlers Association of the Western Reserve.

The Early Settlers Association of the Western Reserve is one of the oldest historic organizations with a mission to preserve, honor and maintain the history of Cleveland and honor individuals whose accomplishments have contributed and promoted the city of Cleveland.

Since 1989, The Perry Group with Zavagno’s leadership has supported Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial in its educational, historic and peacekeeping goals through the promotion and sponsorship of the memorial’s programs and special events.

In making their selection for the 2015 Herrick Memorial Award for Civic Achievement, The Early Settlers Association of the Western Reserve recognized that Zavagno has passionately led The Perry Group and the Battle of Lake Erie Bicentennial Committee in a three-year effort culminating in Ohio’s highly successful two-week victory commemoration in 2013.

"On behalf of The Perry Group and Battle of Lake Erie Bicentennial team and our sponsors, I would like to thank the association and the Herrick family for this award and share in recognizing the critical roles of everyone involved who helped to shine a very bright light on this time in our history,” said Zavagno. “They brought us together as one proud group of modern day settlers. We have met the 200th year anniversary and the forever memories are ours.”

At the award’s luncheon, Zavagno will give an update on the continuing activities and programs of The Friends of Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial.

Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial, located in Put-in-Bay, Ohio was constructed in 1913 to honor those who fought in the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812, and to celebrate the long-lasting peace between Britain, Canada and the United States.

While honoring Zavagno at the July 22 ceremony at 11:00 am at the Lorenzo Carter cabin at Settlers’ Landing in Heritage Park in the Flats, the city of Cleveland will also be celebrating its 219th birthday at the event.

For more information on The Early Settlers Association of the Western Reserve and the Herrick Memorial Award visit http://earlysettlers.org/birthday_cleveland.asp

In addition to his volunteer role with The Perry Group, Zavagno is president of the Solon, OH based Universal Medical Systems, Inc. of Ohio is the leading innovative supplier of veterinary computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems worldwide.

About The Perry Group
The Friends of Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial, also known as The Perry Group, is a volunteer, nonprofit organization working with the National Park Service and the local, national, and international community to commemorate the Battle of Lake Erie and celebrate the long-lasting peace between Britain, Canada and the United States.

Since 1989, The Perry Group has supported Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial in its educational, historic and peacekeeping goals through the promotion and sponsorship of the Memorial’s programs and special events. For more information, visit http://theperrygroup.org/

About Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial
Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial (IPM) is located within the Village of Put-in-Bay, OH. Put-in-Bay is on South Bass Island. IPM was established to honor those who fought in the Battle of Lake Erie, during the War of 1812, and to celebrate the long-lasting peace between Britain, Canada and the U.S. The Memorial, a Doric column, rising 352 feet over Lake Erie is situated 5 miles from the longest undefended border in the world. For more information, visit http://www.nps.gov/pevi/index.htm

About Universal Medical Systems, Inc. of Ohio

Universal Medical Systems, Inc. (UMS) of Ohio is the leading innovative supplier of veterinary computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems worldwide. Headquartered in Cleveland, Universal Medical Systems, Inc. offers medical, industrial and research imaging systems from desktop CT scanners to ultra high field three-tesla MRI scanners. An affiliated network of research, development, sales and service teams supports every UMS scanner.

For more information visit: www.veterinary-imaging.com and http://www.universal-systems.com

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For media interviews, please contact Nancy M. Valent at 216-513-8740 or email, nancy@NMVstrategies.com

Veterinary MRI Hands On Training Course

16th - 17th October, 2015
Tierklinik Haar - Keferloher Strasse 25
Haar - Germany

Continuous education is a major pillar of Esaote’s dedication to even better Veterinary
MRI application.

The venue that we have selected for the 2015 education program is at one of the
best european small animal clinics (www.tierklinik-haar.de), located nearby Munich
(Germany).

In this Vet MRI hands on training course, you will learn from veterinary imaging
experts and share experiences with other Vet MRI users, to improve your skills and
take full advantage of your MRI system’s capabilities.
Moreover you will be provided with practical guidelines on how to optimize sequence
parameters, position the patient and target the body structures to be studied with
the proper coil, in order to produce high resolution images to diagnose with pinpoint
accuracy.

This is not a sit and watch session, in fact to boost interaction, attendees will be
divided into groups for case lab and live sessions on the Vet MRI Grande system, for
a complete educational experience.

FOR THIS REASON THE HANDS-ON-TRAINING SESSION WILL BE
LIMITED TO A MAXIMUM OF 18 ATTENDEES

Click here for complete information

 

UMS & VetPD Align for Excellence in Continuing Education

Solon, OH—June 4, 2015 –Universal Medical Systems, Inc., (UMS) of Ohio, an exclusive supplier of new veterinary computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems (MRI) announces an Educational Partnership with Veterinary Professional Development (VetPD).

VetPD is a UK and Florida-based continuing education provider that organizes 30 highly practical courses, which combine lectures with extensive practical small group sessions which are advertised to 15,000 equine and mixed animal vets per year at 15 of the most highly regarded clinics in the United States and Canada. In Europe, 27 courses are organized in 11 countries including Ireland, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Belgium, Switzerland, Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic.

The organization’s main focus is currently the equine market, but in the coming years, they are developing courses for small animal vets.

“In order to ensure our commitment to excellence in continuing education, VetPD works with a small select number of Educational Partners who are all highly regarded stakeholders in the veterinary field,” said Dr. Emmanuel Engeli, VetPD, managing director.

“As a new Educational Partner, we are proud to now have UMS as colleague to further our high quality individualized continuing education for veterinarians.”

UMS will join two global Educational Partners: Boehringer Ingelheim and Dr. Fritz Endoscopes, as well as, two North American organizations: Universal Imaging and Dechra. VetPD Ltd., which operates in 11 countries in Europe, also has ECM, Audevard, BEVA and ECZM as Educational Partners.

“We are honored to be selected and involved as an Educational Partner with VetPD,” said David Zavagno, president of UMS. “We work closely with veterinarians throughout the world providing focused scanner solutions and first to market technology driven by effective training to generate superb results. The ability to offer education with VetPD will give our clients valuable instruction to help them meet their evolving clinical goals.” 

About VetPD

VetPD LLC is a veterinary continuing education provider dedicated to running the highest quality professional development courses for veterinarians, which include practical or case-based sessions in genuine small groups. VetPD employs internationally renowned speakers and instructors to present current, up-to-date scientific knowledge in their course lectures, using their considerable clinical experience to put the information into context and to give attendees useful practical pointers.

VetPD supports frank and honest topical discussions, with speakers sharing their successes and failures in order to maximize the learning experience for all attending veterinarians. For a detailed list of internationally renowned speakers, visit http://www.VetPD.com/speakers.php

The majority of VetPD courses contain practical small group sessions and lectures that require the addition of hands-on experience under the supervision of specialists to ensure attendees gain the greatest benefit from the professional development courses. VetPD is committed to excellence in customer care and prides itself as a premier continuing education provider. 

The company is dedicated to helping communities in need and disadvantaged peoples by donating 10% of yearly profits to charities they carefully select.

For more information, visit www.VetPD.com

About Universal Medical Systems, Inc. of Ohio

Universal Medical Systems, Inc. (UMS) of Ohio is the leading innovative supplier of veterinary computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems worldwide. Headquartered in Cleveland, Universal Medical Systems, Inc. offers medical, industrial and research imaging systems from desktop CT scanners to ultra high field three-tesla MRI scanners. An affiliated network of research, development, sales and service teams supports every UMS scanner.

For more information visit: www.veterinary-imaging.com and http://www.universal-systems.com

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For media interviews, please contact Nancy M. Valent at 216-513-8740 or email, nancy@NMVstrategies.com

 

From Equine Veterinarian
...Scientific Report by ..::Alexia L McKnight, DVM, DACVR

“Since 2008, low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the stifle has been performed on live horses at multiple veterinary institutions. This article discusses this new technique and summarizes MRI findings in 61 horses compiled from five equine veterinary practices.”

Read more here...(Click to view, right click to download pdf)

From news.illinois.edu
(http://news.illinois.edu/news/11/0330device_RobertO%27Brien.html)

Professor Robert O'Brien

U. of I. veterinarians build better ‘mouse trap’ for enhanced diagnoses

Robert “Bob” O’Brien, professor and head of diagnostic imaging in the College of Veterinary Medicine, demonstrates his invention, the VetMouseTrap™, with his cat Michael.
(Photo by L. Brian Stauffer).

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Veterinary radiologists in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois recently obtained what are believed to be the first 3-D internal renderings of dogs’ larynxes by using a restraint device they created that allows clinicians to perform CT scans on awake small animals without chemical restraint.

The device – which is being tested by veterinary radiologists at universities in Australia, Europe, South Africa, and the U.S. – is a significant advance for veterinary patients, enabling faster diagnosis and more effective treatment of life-threatening diseases such as laryngeal paralysis and laryngeal collapse in dogs, and asthma, heart failure and certain cancers in cats.

The device, the VetMouseTrap™, provides a low-heat, comfortable and nurturing environment for small pets that safely restrains them without the risks of sedation or anesthesia.

The VetMouseTrap™ is a Plexiglas tube with a removable top and foam padding in the bottom that limits patients’ motion, keeping them in a neutral sternal position so clinicians can conduct CT scans. Once the patient is inside the VetMouseTrap™, clinicians fasten it to the CT table with Velcro straps.

The tube’s rounded shape doesn’t create “artifacts” on the CT images, one of 16 criteria that the team identified when it set out to design a restraint device for cats, said Robert T. O’Brien, professor and head of diagnostic imaging in the department of clinical medicine at the veterinary college and leader of the research team.

Accordingly, the transparent acrylic material of the VetMouseTrap™ permits staff to visually monitor patients inside it, and the device closes securely, but has no metal buckles or hinges, keeping the animal contained while allowing quick access to them if needed. Removable padding allows the device to accommodate small patients of different body sizes and behavioral characteristics.

The design is also symmetrical, with ports in each end to accommodate intravenous catheters and oxygen lines so that clinicians need not disconnect and reconnect lines when inserting or removing patients.

“Our goal with our imaging with the VetMouseTrap™ was to provide a higher level of imaging with the lowest cost and the least effects on our patients – without any anesthesia or sedation – so that we can provide that information to the client and the clinician without the need for more advanced, and usually more expensive, procedures to be performed,” O’Brien said.

“That’s not to say that CT is cheap – it’s just extremely quick. What it does more than anything else is give us confidence in the diagnoses and allow us to aggressively treat conditions with a high degree of accuracy. That is in the best interest of the client and the patient. And I hope, in the end, it means more animals will survive their diseases. Mortality is at issue here – these aren’t diseases that animals always get well from.”

A single CT scan of a cat can be obtained in 15 seconds or so, while small dogs take a few seconds longer, O’Brien said. “Sometimes we have to do multiple images of dogs to figure out where their airway problem is, but we can usually be done within five minutes. This is very fast imaging. And the animals are totally awake and not being restrained or anesthetized.”

During the study’s initial phase, the VetMouseTrap™ was tested with 10 healthy cats – a mixture of outdoor and indoor cats – and the cats’ breathing rates and other responses to being inside it were monitored. Only two cats – both of them outdoor cats – showed signs that they were so distressed about being inside the device that they had to be removed. The remaining cats “didn’t appear to be stressed any more than they would be just from being in a strange place,” O’Brien said.

Images of 22 diseased cats, and then of 16 dogs with symptoms of primary laryngeal or tracheal airway obstructions, were obtained using the device.

“We had a very good correlation between what we saw on this advanced CT imaging and the final answers that they were able to get surgically or with endoscopic evaluation, which is the gold standard,” O’Brien said. “This level of detail has never been seen before in veterinary medicine.

We had no imaging modality to image inside the voice box of a dog. It was just not possible. Radiographs couldn’t do it. And even if you did CT, MRI or one of the advanced modalities, you had to place a tube down through the voice box. Then you couldn’t image what you’d just placed the tube down.”

Sedation and general anesthesia are especially dangerous for animals in respiratory distress, and veterinarians have had to weigh the hazards of chemical restraint against the possible diagnostic benefit of CT imaging. Some dogs also have trouble awakening from anesthesia and require an emergency tracheostomy – a surgical procedure where a hole is cut into the dog’s trachea to help it breathe – and sometimes the tracheostomies are required permanently, O’Brien said.

Rabbits and cats, which respond to pain and stress by hunkering down and not moving, “are perfect candidates for the VetMouseTrap™,” O’Brien said. Large dogs, which usually try to escape confinement by frantically barking and digging, are not amenable to it.

“It’s not a best fit with every patient, but it’s worked with almost every cat and with many small dogs,” O’Brien said. “We think there’s a lot of opportunities in other species.”

Researchers in England and Scotland are exploring modifications to the VetMouseTrap™ for general practice veterinarians there, where radiation safety laws prohibit technicians from being in the same room to restrain animals when scans or X-rays are performed, O’Brien said.

The device also has other clinical uses, such as portable oxygen delivery to awake cats that need oxygen therapy, but not necessarily diagnostic scans, in the U. of I. Small Animal Clinic’s emergency room, O’Brien said.

Britain’s Princess Anne, who is patron of the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies at the University of Edinburgh, was photographed examining and talking with faculty researchers about the VetMouseTrap™ during a visit to the school, O’Brien said.

The U. of I. has patented the VetMouseTrap™ and entered into a contract with Universal Medical Systems in Solon, Ohio, to manufacture and market the device as a portable oxygen delivery device for cats. The company also plans to include the device with every veterinary CT scanner it sells. The first 10 units were expected to hit the market April 1, according to the company’s president D.R. Zavagno.

“The introduction of the MouseTrap is a significant improvement and opens the door for an area of imaging not currently service by any other method,” Zavagno said. “Far too often we are using human CT scanners with very little transition for animal specific protocols and imaging requirements. The end result is poor resolution, fair quality, and underutilized installations. The cat trap will be one of the first specific improvements for veterinarians using technology designed for animals.”

Articles about the team’s work with the VetMouseTrap™ have been accepted for publication in the journal Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound. Editor’s note: To contact Robert O’Brien, email bobrien@illinois.edu; 217-778-2256.

D.R. Zavagno to speak at Ohio State College of Veterinary Medicine

D.R.Zaavgno of Universal Medical Systems, will speak on the subject of "When and why to use MRI" at The Ohio State University Veterinary Continuing Educatiion program Technology in Your Practice, in Columbus Ohio, August 8, 2009.

technloogy09.pdf

Kentucky Equine Hospital Unveils First-of-its-Kind Equine MRI Scanner

VetMR Grande XL helps diagnose lameness,
suspensory disease and stifle injuries

Simpsonville, Ky. – March 13, 2007 – Universal Medical Systems, Inc. (UMS), the leading worldwide supplier of innovative veterinary computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, unveiled the world’s first rotating MRI scanner designed specifically for horses the VetMR Grande XL – installed at Equine Services Surgical Hospital (ESSH) in Simpsonville, Ky.

The VetMR Grande XL, which answers superior imaging and versatility needs of the equine veterinary marketplace, is the latest addition to UMS’ firsttomarket line of specialized veterinary CT and MRI systems. The VetMR Grande XL is manufactured by Genova, Italy based Esaote, the world’s leading dedicated MRI company.

According to ESSH’s Dr. Scott Bennett, the VetMR Grande XL has changed the way he and his veterinary staff look at foot and joint lameness, suspensory disease, and softtissue stifle injuries. The VetMR Grande XL now is an integral part of ESSH’s MRI and surgery suite.

“My ability to diagnose and treat many lameness and illness issues has been exponentially enhanced by this scanner,” says Dr. Bennett. “The VetMR Grande XL’s quality and diagnostic capability redefines how we look at many issues within the horse. I now have diagnostic capabilities I have dreamed about for a decade.”

“MRI scanners designed for humans previously used in the equine industry are highly inefficient, costly and cumbersome with limited access for horses. The horse world needed a better option,” says David Zavagno, president of Universal Medical Systems, Inc., supplier of ESSH’s VetMR Grande XL. “The VetMR Grande XL is significantly more efficient to operate, and has the largest access for equine anatomy capable of scanning heads, necks, limbs and stifles. This is a huge clinical upgrade with superb images.”

About VetMR Grande XL

VetMR Grande XL is the world’s first rotating MRI scanner designed specifically for horses. VetMR Grande XL utilizes the latest magnet technology and electronics to create exquisite images. The lowmaintenance VetMR Grande XL can be installed within an existing room, and is powered by a dedicated 220volt power source.

VetMR Grande XL uses computercontrolled radio waves to generate feedback from the animal’s body cells. This newly designed strong magnetic technology creates detailed images to assist the veterinarian, or radiologist, with making a diagnosis and planning treatment.

About Equine Services Surgical Hospital

For more than 25 years Equine Services Surgical Hospital has been dedicated to the health and care of the horse. The hospital is located in Simpsonville, Ky., just 20 miles east of Louisville, and is the only equine referral facility in the area. Its continued success is due in part to the wellqualified veterinarians, excellent support staff, and stateoftheart facilities and diagnostic tools. The facility includes three hospital barns (31 patient stalls), an MRI suite, a surgical suite, two outpatient suites, digital and traditional radiology, nuclear scintigraphy, Nd:YAG laser surgery, highenergy shockwave therapy, video endoscopy, digital ultrasound, and a clinical laboratory. Equine Services also has a fully equipped theriogenology lab and recipient mare herd for embryo transfer. For more information visit: www.equineserviceshosptal.com.

About Dr. Scott Bennett, DVM

Dr. Bennett received his veterinary degree from The Ohio State University in 1977. He was resident veterinarian for a large breeding farm until 1981, at which time he established Equine Services Surgical Hospital. Dr. Bennett's extensive reproduction caseload includes embryo transfer, video hysteroscopy, oviductal evaluation, and stallion evaluation. His surgical practice includes orthopedics (arthroscopy, ASIF), soft tissue (respiratory, reproductive, gastrointestinal), and emergency surgery. Dr. Bennett has pioneered the use of the Nd: YAG laser in a variety of surgical procedures. Currently, Dr. Bennett practices and consults on all breeds of performance horses and provides lameness consultation for many of the top trainers throughout the United States.

About Universal Medical Systems, Inc.

Headquartered in Solon, Ohio, Universal Medical Systems, Inc. is the leading worldwide supplier of innovative veterinary CT and MRI imaging systems.
For more information visit www.veterinaryimaging. com

World’s First Dedicated MRI System for All Small and Large Animals

“Will lead to more effective treatments for our greatest equine athletes” -“beautiful imaging” for small and large animals Cleveland - January 4, 2005 - Universal Medical Systems, Inc. (UMS) unveiled today in North America the Vet-MR Grande™, the world’s first dedicated dual-purpose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system for all small and large animals.

The Vet-MR Grande, which answers superior-imaging and versatility needs of the veterinary marketplace, is the latest addition to UMS’ first-to-market product line of veterinary CT and MRI systems.

UMS has already sold 10 Vet-MR Grande systems, including one to the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, according to David Zavagno, president of Universal Medical Systems. The Vet-MR Grande is manufactured by Genova, Italy-based Esaote, the world’s leading dedicated MRI company.

“The Vet-MR Grande offers veterinarians and their equine patients an exponentially improved ability to accurately diagnose the cause of lameness, as well as sinus, neurological and cervical problems,” says Dr. Alexia McKnight, assistant professor of radiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. “It will lead to more effective treatments for our greatest equine athletes as well as the beloved ‘backyard’ pleasure horse.”

Veterinarians and radiologists at Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine have successfully utilized the Vet-MR Grande system since July 2005 at the school’s large-animal facility, New Bolton Center, in Kennett Square, Pa. The New Bolton Center is the first facility in North America to offer the Vet-MR Grande.

“Through our consultations with companion animal and equine practitioners over the past year we learned needs exist for a new superior-imaging MRI system that handles all small and large animals,” says Zavagno. “Three of the largest problems reported in the equine market are poor image quality, access to equipment and user difficulties.”

He adds, “The Grande’s scans maintain integrity and are not compromised by blurred images caused by swaying patient animals.”

The Vet-MR Grande’s large surface scanning area and specially designed magnet address these problems and improve image quality dramatically. The system produces advanced diagnostic images from stationary scans of the head, neck and legs of large animals.

Veterinarians and radiologists at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have used Vet-MR technology since November 2004, when UMS installed North America’s first dedicated veterinary MRI system for companion pets.

“The images are beautiful and the machine is here 24/7 just for the animals,” says Dr. Peter Scrivani, a board-certified radiologist at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. “This is an open MRI, not a closed tunnel that the patient disappears into. Not that dogs and cats care much about claustrophobia, but the open MRI seems to make the pet owners more comfortable.”

Before Vet-MR technology, imaging veterinary cases was a challenge. Animals had to share human MR facilities after hours in medical centers or resort to used people-sized machines at veterinary clinics. The result: escalated costs to pet owners. To achieve improved image resolution, there are several prerequisites: ensuring a stationary animal patient, utilizing a system designed to image specific anatomy and refining a library of protocols developed from decades of imaging experience, Zavagno notes.

The Vet-MR Grande is a clinically refined system designed by Esaote and built from a platform of experience derived from over 1,000 machine installations worldwide.

The Vet-MR Grande, available for purchase or a monthly lease and supported by accessible customer service, does not require costly build-out of special scanning rooms.

CT scans save pet lives ,,,

Last month Torrey, my Teacup Chihuahua, and I attend the Western Veterinary Conference (WVC) in Las Vegas, a popular event for veterinarians’ continuing education...
read more here http://www.petsbest.com/blog/ct-scans-save-lives/